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  • UKRENERGO REVIEW 9 MARCH – 16 MARCH 2018

    Notwithstanding the fact the spring 2018 is only on the calendar, it is Friday today. Friday vibes are always on the same wave with Ukrenergo as it`s a day when you get acquainted with the latest energy news from all over the world.

    Take your gadget, open the link and plunge into the energy whirlwind:

    Image – news.mit.edu

    1.Free and endless energySpecialists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Fusion Systems company announced that the production of the absolutely free and fusion power would start in the nearest 15 years in the USA.  Development of this carbon-free, combustion-free source of energy is now on a faster track toward realization, thanks to a collaboration between MIT and a new private company, Commonwealth Fusion Systems.  (CFS). CFS will join with MIT to carry out rapid, staged research leading to a new generation of fusion experiments. New project is called SPARC and its goal is power plants based on advances in high-temperature superconductors — work made possible by decades of federal government funding for basic research. CFS is announcing today that it has attracted an investment of $50 million in support of this effort from the Italian energy company Eni.  In addition, CFS continues to seek the support of additional investors. The system will be based on the small superconducting magnets. That will ensure the rapidly commercializing fusion energy along with establishing a new industry.  By using magnets made from the newly available superconducting material — a steel tape coated with a compound called yttrium-barium-copper oxide (YBCO) — SPARC is designed to produce a fusion power output. The way these high-field magnets slash the size of plants needed to achieve a given level of power has repercussions that reverberate through every aspect of the design. Because the magnets are the key technology for the new fusion reactor, and because their development carries the greatest uncertainties, work on the magnets will be the initial three-year phase of the project — building upon the strong foundation of federally funded research conducted at MIT and elsewhere. Once the magnet technology is proven, the next step of designing the SPARC tokamak is based on a relatively straightforward evolution from existing tokamak experiments.

    Photo – reuters.com

    2.An agreement to remember«E.On SE» and «RWE AG»: two European energy companies focus their activities. Е.On and RWE provided actually the same services by generating power on the coal and nuclear power plants.  The current changes are related with the transit of Germany to the renewable energy sources. E.ON will be transformed into a highly focused provider of European energy networks and state-of-the-art customer solutions, ideally positioned to drive Europe’s energy transition by innovation whereas RWE will become a leading European electricity producer by means of renewable energy with attractive growth potential, optimally combined with security of supply through its conventional power plants and energy trading. E.ON and RWE agreed today that RWE will transfer its entire stake of 76.8 percent in innogy to E.ON via a far-reaching exchange of assets and businesses. The total offer value of €40.00 per share will consist of an offer price of €36.76 per share, plus the payment of assumed dividends from innogy SE of a total of €3.24 per share for the fiscal years 2017 and 2018. The transaction brings together the strengths of both previously vertically integrated German energy utilities by enabling a focus on networks and customer solutions on the one hand, and on a fully diversified generation business on the other. E.ON and RWE will be strategically well positioned after this transaction. Both companies are convinced that their positions in their respective core businesses can be further strengthened. Their solid financial foundations will provide a basis for sustainable profit growth and attractive dividends in the long term. Both companies pledge that any integration measures will be carried out based on long established partnerships with the representatives of the works councils and trade unions.

    Photo – bloomberg.com

    3.The biggest nuclear power plant in the worldWhereas Germany give up the idea of operating nuclear power plants, the French and Indian leaders have approved their wish to commission the construction of the biggest nuclear power plant, Jaitaour. Advancing talks that have continued for nearly a decade. French President Emmanuel Macron and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi urged Electricite de France SA and India’s monopoly atomic energy producer, Nuclear Power Corp., to accelerate discussions on a contract and start work at the site in Jaitapur, in Maharashtra state, by December. “Once installed, the Jaitapur project will be the largest nuclear power plant in the world, with a total capacity of 9.6 gigawatts,” according to a joint statement issued Saturday by the governments during Macron’s visit to India. French state-run reactor maker Areva SA signed an initial agreement in 2009 with Nuclear Power for the Jaitapur project following a civil nuclear cooperation accord between the governments. After Areva’s restructuring, EDF in 2016 signed an initial pact with the Indian atomic energy producer to supply six reactors at Jaitapur, a small town on India’s western coast known for its mango and coconut orchards. India’s nuclear power capacity is about 6.8 gigawatts, barely 2 percent of the country’s total generation capacity.  

    Image – people.in.ua

    4.Artificial intelligence can make power firms more efficient. Utilities can increase their efficiency by using more artificial intelligence (AI) technology, such as software to predict demand swings in the powergrid or to control home appliances, consultancy Roland Berger said. European utilities could achieve efficiency gains of up to a fifth over the next five years using such technology, it said, adding that less than a quarter of firms had a strategy to do this. Power firms across Europe, which previously depended on coal or gas-fired power plants, are having to adapt to the expanding use of renewable power sources and facing a profit squeeze as wholesale electricity prices have fallen.   “Companies need to respond to this change and come up with new business models,” Torsten Henzelmann, partner at Roland Berger, said. “To do that they need new technologies such as artificial intelligence.” The rise of renewables, such as solar and wind that provide intermittent supply, has increased the need for intelligent IT systems to balance demand and supply swings as companies seek to meet energy and carbon emissions targets, the consultancy said. E.ON, one of Germany’s largest energy companies, struck a deal last week with San Francisco-based start-up Sight Machine to offer software that uses machine learning to improve manufacturing processes and lower energy costs.

    Image – australianmanufacturing.com.au

    5.New energy-hub in AustraliaHydrogen infrastructure company Hydrogen Utility (H2U) will construct a 15MW hydrogen electrolyser power plant near Port Lincoln, South Australia. The $117.5 million project – to be delivered in partnership with German-based thyssenkrupp – will integrate a range of innovative hydrogen technologies, including a 15MW electrolyser plant, a distributed ammonia production facility, and a 10MW hydrogen-­fired gas turbine and 5MW hydrogen fuel cell, which will both supply power to the grid. H2U CEO Dr Attilio Pigneri said the electrolyser plant will be one of the largest of its kind in the world, and among the first ever to produce distributed ammonia from intermittent renewable resources that can be used as an industrial fertiliser.  It will provide balancing services to the national transmission grid, fast frequency response support to new solar plants under development in the Eyre Peninsula, supply green ammonia and other chemicals to the local farming and aquaculture sectors, and host the demonstration, at scale, of novel supply chain technologies for the export of green hydrogen from Australia to markets in the Asia-­Pacific region. More renewable energy means cheaper power and the ability to store renewables means the benefits of that cheap power can be experienced around the clock. Hydrogen also offers an opportunity to create a new industry in South Australia where we can export our sun and wind resources to the world. South Australia is at the global forefront of a broad range of storage technology, from big batteries, to virtual power plants to pumped hydro – now it will also be home to one of the largest hydrogen production facilities in the world as well.

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