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  • UKRENERGO REVIEW 29 DECEMBER – 5 JANUARY 2018

     New Year. New horizons and new perspectives. Ukrenergo comes up with new ideas and inspirational views as always on Friday. Please welcome our first Ukrenergo review-2018. The first week-2018 is remarkable for:

    Image – ec.europa.eu

      1. Energy year for EU. The Estonian ministers of energy did have a fruitful year in the EU. To the surprise of many, the Estonians were able to make good on their promise to get member state agreement on all of the various elements of the Clean Energy Package, put forward by the European Commision last year.  It really is a great victory. The remaining elements to be agreed by all 28 ministers have the objective of transforming have the objective of transforming the bloc’s energy markets to prepare for more renewable energy flowing into the system, and enabling energy to flow more freely within the EU single market, across national borders. The changes are also meant to allow consumers to generate their own electricity, and have more control over when and how they use energy. Now that the Council has a joint position on the seven pieces of legislation, negotiations can begin with the European Parliament. Last week, the Estonians reached an agreement with the Parliament on on a piece of legislation to boost energy efficiency in buildings. That leaves seven other pieces of legislation in the Clean Energy Package to be negotiated by Bulgaria.

    Image – tripsavvy.com

    2. Electricity to all. The new year will bring power to more than a hundred of villages in India. 2018 will be remarkable as the government accelerate efforts to achieve the mammoth task of reaching powerto more than a quarter of a billion people  who lack access to electricity. Year 2017 was an important year, when government unveiled the SAUBHAGYA plan which was to provide electricity connection to the rural areas. The objective of Saubhagya scheme is to provide last mile connectivity and electricity connections to all households in rural and urban areas. In order to boost electricity consumption particularly in rural areas under the Saubhagya scheme, the government has planned installation of more and more pre-paid meters. Besides that, families located in remote and inaccessible areas would be provided with Solar Photovoltaic (SPV) based standalone systems with LED lights, fan, power plug etc. As on November 30, 2017, electrification in 124,219 villages and intensive electrification in 468,827 villages has been completed.  The remaining 2,217 villages are expected to be electrified by May 1, 2018. A great example of the effective energy policy implementation in a huge country.

    Photo – techspot.com

    3. Epublic transport. Every public bus in China`s Shenzhen is powered by electricity. If you’ve felt the world hasn’t done enough to push the electric revolution forward to combat climate change, China might be able to change your mind. One of the most populated cities in the country with roughly 11.9 million citizens, Shenzhen has recently announced the completion of their fully electric fleet of 16,359 public transportation buses. Shenzhen officials believe this change could save the city the “energy equivalent of 366,000 tons of standard coal” while reducing carbon dioxide emissions by an impressive 1.35 million tons. Shenzhen has also constructed about 8,000 individual bus charging points spread across 510 charging stations throughout the city. According to one Fast Company report, over 80 percent of Shenzhen’s new buses have been manufactured by a single company – BYD (Build Your Dreams).  As the company has reportedly surpassed Tesla to become the largest electric vehicle manufacturer in the world, it comes as no surprise that the city has chosen to take advantage of its services.  As of writing, 62.5 percent (12,518) of all taxis in the city are electric but government officials plan to increase that number to 100 percent by 2020.  Well, we are heading closer and closer towards clean future.  

    4. Weather surprises. Winter storm Carmen has cut power to about 65,000 households in western France and is moving south, power grid company Enedis said. Some 40,000 households in the Brittany region experienced power cuts but 30,000 have now been reconnected said Enedis, which has mobilized 1,500 staff to restore fix power lines. However, we are especially estonished by the timeframes of the electricity supply resumption.  Enedis, a unit of French state-controlled utility EDF, said in a statement the storm was now moving to the regions of Poitou-Charente, Pays de Loire and Aquitaine. Winds with speeds of up to 140 kilometers per hour battered the country’s Atlantic coast in mid-afternoon but no serious damage was reported. Major power cuts or blackouts are rare in France, which produces three quarters of its power with nuclear energy. In July 2015, some 830,000 households temporarily lost power in western France after exceptionally warm weather damaged transformers. Moreover the Carmen storm affected some regions of Great Britain and the Netherlands. Power supply has already been restored as well there.  

    Photo – bbc.com

    5. The greenest year ever. 2017 will become famous in UK as”the greenest year” ever, the National Grid states. The rise of renewable energy helped break 13 clean energy records in 2017. Just as an example, In June, for the first time, wind, nuclear and solar power generated more UK power than gas and coal combined. In April, the UK had its first 24-hour period without using any coal power since the Industrial Revolution. This changing landscape saw the cost of offshore wind power fall below the price of nuclearfor the first time.

    Britain has halved carbon emissions in the electricity sector since 2012. Thus, the country becomes the fourth cleanest power system in Europe and seventh worldwide. Separate findings from power research group MyGridGB show that renewable energy sources provided more power than coal for 90% of 2017. But despite the successes, groups warned the UK must now tackle its reliance on gas if it is to meet its emission targets. Dr Andrew Crossland from MyGridGB and the Durham Energy Institute said: “The government has focused on reducing coal use which now supplies less than 7% of our electricity. We have to pay more attention to gas”. An Energy Department spokesman said the UK was reducing emissions faster than any other G7 country – which includes the US, Japan, Germany, Italy, France and Canada. He said the government plans to reduce carbon emissions throughout the 2020s, while supporting the creation of well-paid jobs in the low carbon sector.

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