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  • UKRENERGO REVIEW 26 JANUARY – 2 FEBRUARY 2018

    Get your happy on… it`s Friday and it means our last Ukrenergo review edition is ready. World tendencies in the energy sphere, breakthroughs and comments. Get ready to forget about frosty and hectic week and plunge into the 5-minute reading. Today we can offer you the following:

    Photo – weforum.org

     1. France is to shut all coal-fired power stations by 2021. The World Economic Forum has already ended however, there is a lot of facts and news to discuss. One of the news that certainly needs attention is statement of the President Emmanuel Macron regarding shut dowmn of all coal-fired power stations in France by 2021. President Macron said he wanted to “make France a model in the fight against climate change,” as one of five pillars in his plans to reform the economy.   Across the European Union, the economic tide is already turning against coal power: more than half of the bloc’s 619 coal-powered plants are losing money, according to a Carbon Tracker report.  A combination of rapidly falling prices for renewables and air pollution laws are pushing them out of business. Hence, the following step will help France, as the President assumes, to combat the global climate changes. The president stated as well they would finance more researches and development of the energy innovations. They are to create the fund with a capital up to 10 mln €. Not long returned from a meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping, President Macron acknowledged the Chinese leader’s commitment to the Paris Agreement. Looking ahead to the gargantuan infrastructure project set to link China with Europe, Macron said: “The new Silk Road has to be a green road. We cannot have a coal-based route.” Hence, one of the support poles of the French energy has fallen. What thus is to be done within the nuclear power stations?

    Photo – cleanenergynews.co.uk

    2. £30 million to launch theVehicle to grid” projects. British business minister Richard Harrington presented the government investments earlier this week. Almost £30 million has been awarded to over 20 vehicle to grid (V2G) projects.  The following projects unite vehicle manufacturers, aggregators, infrastructure operators, energy suppliers and academia across the UK in the first major investment in the technology from government. These projects will provide the consumers with the opportunity to use their car battery to power the houses or earn money by selling the spare energy back into the network at peak times. A project led by the E-Car Club will seek to establish feasibility for a blockchain-enabled vehicle to local grid service. Another example is Bus2Grid project, the first large scale, multi-megawatt demonstration of V2G in electric bus depots in  The e4Future projects is interesting as well as it will evaluate responses of distinct consumer groups to commercial V2G offer. With the funding now allocated the winning consortiums have between 12-36 months to deliver their projects depending on their allotted time. As of today, Britain has launched the governmental support and coordinated actions of all stakeholders namely funding from the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Office of Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) as well as “one-voice policy” of the car manufacturers as Honda, Nissan і Mitsubishi. Looks like the UK has all the chances to implement the V2G technologies.

    Photo – flagi.in.ua

    3. Myanmar to double electricity capacity by 2021. Let us speak frankly: do you know that much about the energy sector of the Asian Myanmar? Leaves much to be desired, doesn`t it? However, big changes are heading there. Myanmar is planning to double its electric power capacity by 2021 by building natural gas-fired power plants in an ambitious move to tackle chronic power shortages in the energy-starved country. With only one-third of the country’s 60 million people connected to the electrical grid and cities experiencing blackouts, Myanmar needs to boost its power supply to attract much-needed foreign investment. New government led by Aung San Suu Kyi swept to power in March 2016 and they sated that issue as the top-priority one. Hence, last week two senior officials told Reuters on Wednesday they planned to build four natural gas-fired power plants by 2021. The total cost of the project amounts to $5.6 bln consisting of government expenditures and private investments.  They said the plants will raise generation capacity by 3,100 MW and would double the current capacity of around 3,000 MW.Most of the power Myanmar imports from the neighboring countries. Just to compare: the Ukrainian energy system possesses up to 55,3 GW. Hence, the following projects is to be a real breakthrough in Myanmar. Myanmar’s government has signed agreements to “start preliminary engineering work,” such as environmental assessments, with six companies, said Zaw Win Naing, assistant secretary at the ministry. The companies include TOTAL, Siemens AG , Zhefu Holding, TTCL Public Company Ltd , Sinohydro Corporation and Myanmar-based Supreme Trading. Electrification and large-scale energy reforms have already become a certain tendency within the Southeast Asian region. Some similar plans were presented as well by India last year whereas China demonstrates a leap towards energy sector development. 

    Poto – electrek.co

    4. Construction of the worlds largest offshore wind farm. The world`s largest offshore wind power developer –Ørsted  has launched a construction of the largest offshore wind. The wind farm is located 100 km off the coast of Yorkshire, UK.  The project is to be fulfilled by 2020. The wind farm is named Hornsea Project One; its capacity will amount to 1.2GW and will be constructed of 174 7.0MW turbines. The turbine model being installed – SWT-7.0-154  – is manufactured by Siemens.  According to Ørsted, an 8MW turbine – the MH1 by Vestas – generates enough electricity in one revolution of the turbine blades to power a house for 29 hours.  It should be mentioned the individual blades are 75 meters long and the total area covered when the blades spin is, 18,600m2.   Moreover, two ships are building the project. The ship – Innovation – has a load capacity of 8,000 tons and can install in waters up to a 65 meter depth.  The second ship, built by A2SEA, is named the Sea Installer. It carries the turbines and blades to the site. It can handle up to four of the 7MW turbines at once.  The power stations is to be the largest one in the world however will it last for long? The world’s largest wind project is the Gansu Wind Farm Project in China. The project has a current capacity of 8GW, with a planned capacity of 20GW. Following the latest power breakthroughs of China, we won’t be surprised if the project is executed in toto.

    Photo – ecosoft.in.ua

    5. Norway`s operator is to delay the launch of the interconnector with Scotland. Statnett, Norwegian TSO, seeks to delay the NorthConnect, power transmission link to Scotland. The 1.4 GW link, NorthConnect is currently due to be in operation by 2022 or 2023 (NorthConnect is a joint project by three Norwegian power firms and Sweden’s Vattenfall). Statnett, however, said adding more export and import capacity will complicate operations in the Nordic grid, requiring IT investments and close integration with Statnett, all of which can be difficult to achieve and have uncertain timelines. Plugging in NorthConnect at the same time could make it challenging for the Nordic grid to handle the flows and could lead to a capping of capacity in order to keep the system reliable. NorthConnect has its critics in Norway, with the country’s opposition and several unions campaigning against it in the last years, fearing it would raise domestic power prices.  Norway’s average spot power price for Oslo, the capital, was at 29.04 euros per megawatt hour in 2017, one of the lowest in Europe.  NorthConnect project chairman Odd Oeygarden said the cable’s partners disagreed with Statnett’s report and would discuss the case with Norway’s state regulator prior to an expected decision on issuing a license.  

     

     

     

     

     

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