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  • UKRENERGO REVIEW 23 FEBRUARY – 2 MARCH 2018

    Dull sky and frosty weather will be shortly substituted by the bright sunshine of the spring. In order to wait it in a more comfortable and hot atmosphere we offer you to plunge into the latest energy news form all over the world.We begin and today we will speak about: 

    Photo – electrek.co

    1.World`s largest solar station. The Benban Solar Park aims to reach somewhere between 1.6-2.0GW of solar power by the middle of 2019.  The plants will cost a total of $823 million to build, whereas the capacity will amount to 1,6-2 GW. All in all the Benban Solar Park will consist of 32 solar power plants. The first plants with a total capacity of 165 MW have already started the operational activities. The projects is not financed by the state at the moment. However, it will be given a 25-year contract to sell its electricity at 7.8¢/kWh to the state-owned Egyptian Electricity Transmission Company (EETC) and pegged to the value of the US dollar. The park will be located at the area of 37,3 square kilometers in a desert. At least 325MW of the site will make use of NEXTracker’s single axis trackers. Another 64MW of single axis trackers will be deployed by German group ‘Mounting Systems GmbH.‘ All in all, the Benban Solar Park will consist of 32 solar power plants. The park is a comprehensive financial model, partly supported by the government, which allows investment groups to develop large-scale solar energy projects at an affordable price. More detailed description of the project can be found here. Among other things, the park presents sophisticated financial models. For example, in order to eliminate bankers’ fears, the “Multilateral Investment and Guarantee Agency” (MIGA), the World Bank Group, provides $ 210 million of “political risk” insurance to private creditors and investors involved in the solar park. A wonderful case from Egypt.

    Photo – energy.economictimes.indiatimes.com

    2.Quite a sensitive gridFrance to meet record power usage and is to ensure peak power consumption with massive power imports from Spain, Germany and other countries.   France has Europe’s most temperature-sensitive electricity grid as about a third of French homes are heated with electric radiators and every one degree Celsius drop in outside temperature requires an extra 2,400 megawatt hours in power, equivalent to the power consumption of the city of Paris. New RTE forecasts show maximum forecast electricity consumption of 95,000 megawatt hours (MW) on Tuesday evening at 1945 Central European Time, which would be the second-highest power consumption level since the 102,100 MW record on Jan 8, 2012. On Wednesday, peak usage of 94,626 MW is forecast for 0930 CET, but peak consumption will level off in the second half of the week as temperatures rise. An RTE spokesman said about 9,500 MW of power is available for import during Tuesday evening’s peak, compared to maximum interconnection capacity of about 12,000 MW. The French transmission grids may not use all that capacity Tuesday evening and are expected to import some 3,500 MW from Germany and Belgium, 2,300 MW from Spain and 1,500 MW from Switzerland during peak usage time. Whereas the EDF’s total nuclear capacity is 63,260 MW from 58 nuclear reactors. However, given the safety- and maintenance-related outages, nearly 11,000 MW of nuclear capacity is offline. In spite of this, the RTE states that there are no power outages, and the company will ensure the  demand. Another example is that the synchronization of energy markets has not only economic but also security benefits.

    Image – balkangreenenergynews.com

    3.Energy Community enhances the cooperation with the Mediterranean countries. РThe Energy Community Regulatory Board (ECRB) and Mediterranean Energy Regulators (MedReg)  agreed to step up cooperation at a recent meeting hosted by the Energy Community Secretariat.  The meeting was attended by the national regulators of the Energy Community Contracting Parties as well as the MedReg regulatory members of Jordan, Malta, Spain, Italy, Palestine and Lebanon.  Energy is a highly interconnected sector that requires us to look beyond mere institutional boundaries. The countries of the region have to cooperate tightly which will only enhance their development. Energy infrastructure investments already span across the EU, Energy Community and Mediterranean countries and will increasingly do so. Investors very rightly demand us to align the legal framework of these interconnected markets.  Namely these issues were discussed during the last meeting. Following a series of joint high-level roundtable discussions launched in 2014, ECRB and MedReg for the first time agreed to prepare a common report on customer protection and, specifically, customer complaint handling, dispute settlement and customer awareness. The report is expected to be published by end of 2018.  The regulatory bodies will hold joint preparatory meetings as well as a customer workshop in cooperation with the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) in June this year. The Energy Community has proven to be a great platform for harmonizing the energy markets of the Contracting Parties with EU policies. Strengthening cooperation with the countries of the Mediterranean is one of the active vectors of the organization.

    Photo– golosodesa.com.ua

    4.Germany will build a 22 MW storage to balance the wind parks operation.   The 22 MW Cremzow facility will be Enel’s first storage plant in Germany and will provide grid stabilisation services through primary frequency regulation. The energy storages will balance the wind parks operation within the country. Enel, through its renewables subsidiary Enel Green Power Germany (EGP Germany), has signed an agreement with German wind energy company ENERTRAG AG and Swiss energy storage solutions company Leclanché SA to build and manage a 22 MW lithium-ion battery storage plant in Cremzow, in the German state of Brandenburg. The project is Enel’s first storage plant in Germany and its construction will involve an investment of around 17 million euros.

    The storage plant will provide frequency regulation services to Germany’s Primary Control Reserve (PCR) market to rapidly stabilise the grid, and will later be integrated with ENERTRAG wind farms. The first 2 MW section of the Cremzow plant is expected to be operational in April 2018, while the launch of the entire plant is planned for the end of this year. The project will provide the grid with a real-time primary frequency regulation service contributing to its stability.  When the grid’s frequency decreases due to high power demand, the battery will rapidly deliver its stored energy, while in response to frequency increases due to low demand, the battery is charged with the surplus energy. Furthermore, the integration with ENERTRAG wind farms will allow for the use of surplus energy produced by the facilities to charge the battery, cutting back on the need to curtail wind power generation when it is higher than demand on the grid.

    Photo – agenda.ge

    5.Georgia is to become a regional electricity trade center.  Large European  еenergy companies  Nord Pool and Bluberries will prepare recommendations for Georgia to help the country become a regional center for electricity trade. Georgia’s Economy Minister Dimitry Kumsishvili has met the representatives of both energy companies in Georgia’s capital of Tbilisi today.  As a result of this meeting the sides agreed to sign a Memorandum of Cooperation. Within the MoC Nord Pool and Bluberries will have to prepare recommendations for Georgia during a one year period of time.The recommendations will provide guidelines on how to create a competitive electricity market in Georgia and how to become the regional hub for electricity trade. Georgia’s Economy Minister also talked about electricity market reform projects at the meeting. If this trend is maintained, the government estimates that the government is expecting a 10-year shortage of electricity. The strategic goal of the country’s leadership is to attract the maximum amount of investment in the industry and ensure the sustainable development of the national energy system. Since 2008, Georgia liberalized the energy market and abolished state regulation. Today, the Georgian electricity sector is actually completely privatized, which creates a productive field for further development of the industry as a whole.

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